Collins Street Medical Centre

AGPAL Accredited General Practice

Quality and Innovation in Healthcare

Health News

Measles Outbreak in Melbourne

UPDATE: Five new cases of measles have been reported to Victoria's Department of Health and Human Services, which brings the tally of those affected by the outbreak in Melbourne to nine including the four earlier confirmed cases in adult individuals residing in the Brunswick area.(22/02/2016)

Measles is a contagious viral illness that causes a skin rash and fever. Serious and sometimes fatal complications include pneumonia and encephalitis (brain inflammation). Measles is also known as rubeola, not to be confused with rubella (German measles). Worldwide, measles is the fifth highest cause of illness and death in children.

Measles is rare in Australia because of the widespread use of the measles vaccine. It is important to continue immunising children in Australia, because there is a risk that the infection can be brought in by people arriving or returning from overseas.

Measles - Health Alert February 2016

Measles:

  • Measles is a very contagious viral illness that causes a skin rash and fever.
  • Measles can cause serious, sometimes fatal, complications including pneumonia and encephalitis. Measles is rare in Australia because of the widespread use of the measles vaccine but vaccination is important because people coming from overseas can carry the virus.

To date, no common exposure sites for the cases have been identified, however in all cases the disease has been acquired locally with no history of overseas travel. This constitutes a community outbreak with local transmission. All cases visited public areas in Brunswick and other inner Melbourne areas while they were infectious between 29 January and 9 February 2016

As measles is highly infectious through airborne transmission, other secondary cases could occur in susceptible people. Measles has an incubation period of between 7 and 18 days (average 14 days from exposure to rash) so should be considered in any susceptible person who presents with a compatible illness now or up until the end of February 2016.


If you have concerns about your medical health, make an appointment to see one of our GP's for advice.

For more information about Measles visit:
BetterHealth Channel Website →